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Onaburekhan got Band 8.5 without reading any IELTS books, here’s how

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Today we’re bringing you the story of Onaburekhan, a 33 year-old man from Nigeria who took the IELTS test to become a pharmacist in the UK. Not only did he get a truly remarkable score and won in our monthly IELTS results competition, but also achieved it without studying any IELTS books while preparing for the exam. Here is how Onaburekhan did it, in his own words:

Band 9 in IELTS“I never imagined in a million years that I would achieve this result, it just happened. I actually thought I was doomed after I finished the test because I found it quite difficult. I am in the military and I haven’t really done anything academic for over 3 years, and I wanted to use this test to gauge myself academically and find out how much I have gained or lost.

I only started revising for the test about 2 weeks beforehand because I was busy with work. I needed a Band 7 in all the 4 elements in a single sitting to apply for a Pharmacy conversion programme (OSPAP) here in the UK. I didn’t study any books, I used www.IELTS-Blog.com, to understand the structure of the test and what to do to get the right band scores. I think it helped that I already have a research-based MSc from a UK university because I did quite a lot of writing to achieve a good MSc grade. It also helped that I am more of a BBC and Channel 4 news kind of person, these programmes have helped boost my understanding of English and speaking.

I would advise IELTS candidates to improve their Speaking and Listening skills by watching the BBC News coverage from around the world. They can also improve their Writing and Reading skills by engaging in loads of practise prior to the test. To be honest, I didn’t really practise reading and writing because I have been subconsciously doing so all through my studying and working career as a Pharmacist in my home country. Candidates who do not have English as a first language would definitely need lots of practise if they are aiming for a high score in IELTS.

IELTS-Blog.com should be the first point of call for resources that would help boost a candidate’s IELTS score. I used it and it helped me achieve what I need in the first attempt, and I strongly recommend that candidates should follow the guidance written there in order to get the Band they need.”

5 Things You Can Do Today to Raise Your Listening Score [by Hamid, Band 9 in IELTS Listening]

Hamid is a 30 year old IELTS test taker, who got an Overall Band Score of 8.5 with two straight 9′s in the Listening and Speaking sub tests. When we asked Hamid what his advice would be to other IELTS candidates trying to raise their score, he invested a lot of effort and put together the following tips. Have a read, and see what you can change about YOUR Listening practice today, to get a big improvement:

Band 9 in IELTS“It’s generally believed there’s nothing candidates can do to elevate their score in a short period of time. I beg to differ and do believe that with enough dedication, practice, time allocation and directed guidance, getting a higher score in Listening is not so far-fetched.

Here are some tips that might help with this section.

1. First and foremost, make sure you LISTEN to the recording, do not just HEAR it. A simple distinction between LISTENING and HEARING is that the element of ATTENTION is missing in hearing. When answering questions, learners must listen thoroughly to the recording instead of reading the questions. Simply put, do NOT READ and LISTEN at the same time. Before the recording is played out for you, focus ALL your attention on your booklet. While listening to the recording, on the other hand, direct ALL you attention to the recording with a question in mind, in other words, LISTEN. I even sometimes ask my students NOT to look at the question, and instead to JUST LISTEN to avoid distraction.

2. Another important point you need to keep in mind is that you don’t need to answer ALL the questions to get a good score. If you manage to answer even 30 out of 40 questions, you can still get a 7, which is a high score. Remember that the level of difficulty of questions vary in the IELTS Test (in both Listening and Reading sections). As far as Listening is concerned, for instance, FIVE questions are so difficult that only those candidates aiming for a band 8, 8.5 or 9 can answer them. The tricky part is that these challenging questions are RANDOMLY and of course CLEVERLY distributed in order to distract test takers. A smart and successful candidate is one who does not let a difficult question make him/her lose the track of the audio. My point – if you miss one question, even two, do not PANIC. They are most probably WAY above your level. IMMEDIATELY RECOVER so you don’t miss the questions you are capable of dealing with. Don’t let difficult questions have a DOMINO EFFECT on your general performance.

3. In order to maximize your score and better your performance, you need to minimize your errors in Section 1. Many candidates, even with an acceptable level of listing ability, perform poorly in this section, simply because it is the VERY first section of the Listening test. To manage your anxiety, and in turn maximize your performance, do PLENTY of practice tests and mock tests. Practice NUMBERS and DICTATION. Develop a system. Find a list of words that are frequently used. I’ve come up with a fantastic and sure-fire system: PDM (Pronunciation, Dictation, Meaning). If you find a word challenging in terms of PRONUNCIATION, mark it P. In this case, when you later on refer to it, the P reminds you that you had difficulty pronouncing that word right. The same thing can be applied to DICTATION (D) and MEANING (M).

4. An insurmountable problem for the vast majority of candidates, regardless of their listening ability, is indeed Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs), which frequently appear in Section 3 of the IELTS Test. This type of question appears to be challenging for a number of reasons.

First of all, candidates do not have time for reading all the questions and their options. This gets even more challenging with questions with long answer options. The solution? MAKE TIME. Instead of wasting your invaluable time REREADING questions in Section 1 and Section 2, budget your time so you have enough time to read and re-read questions in Sections 3 and 4. Be at least one or two steps AHEAD of the recording, if you will. Use the time you are given at the end of each section to prepare yourself for questions in the following section.

A second reason why MCQs challenge candidates has again to do with LISTENING and HEARING. A colossal mistake many candidates make while answering this type of questions is that, while the recording is played out, they keep RE-READING the options. They feel they are listening to the recording, while, in reality, they are not; they are HEARING. Do NOT make the same mistake. Make sure you have already read, understood and underlined the key parts of each option. Wait until the speaker(s) is/are finished talking about a question and THEN decide which option fits better. A classic mistake is that candidates try to decide on the correct option, while the speaker(s) is still giving information about a question. Wait till he/she is done and then decide quickly.

Remember that a sure-fire way to arrive at the correct answer is by eliminating other options. The options that we do NOT want are

  • the ones which are too obvious and easy. Do NOT choose any option simply because it contains a word you heard on the recording. Most questions in Section 3 are INFERENTIAL, meaning that they are not DIRECTLY mentioned. So watch out for too easy and obvious options. They are most probably the ones you won’t need.
  • the ones which are in direct contradiction with the recording. In almost all cases, one or even two options out of three are REJECTED, so by being on the lookout for such options and eliminating them, you can maximize your chance of finding the correct answer.
  • the ones which are mentioned at the same time. More often than not, two out of three options in MCQs are mentioned in the recording, using a connector (AND, ALONG WITH, etc.) Just be aware of the fact that when it happens, for example answers A and C are mentioned one after the other with a connector, be sure that neither of them is the correct answer.

5. One more thing: watch SERIES and LISTEN TO ENGLISH music. It WORKS WONDERS. The instructional value of watching series is far more than that of watching movies for some simple reasons:

  • Many movies contain a lot of background noise, which some learners find distracting.
  • There are more dialogues in series compared to movies.
  • Watching series creates a feeling of SUSPENSE in the viewer, which encourages learners to follow the other episodes of their favorite series. This will in turn result in more learning opportunities.
  • After watching a specific series, viewers develop a sense of empathy with some characters and get accustomed to their state of mind. This feeling of understanding and bonding can result in better comprehension.

I hope you find these few tips useful. I’m sure with enough dedication, active listening, awareness and guidance, your listening score can easily be improved.”